Category Archives: Movement of people out of Gaza

Isn’t treating trauma a priority?

While most people tend to focus on the physical repercussions of the humanitarian situation and repeated Israeli military operations in Gaza, the unseen mental health consequences are just as grave. According to the United Nations, over 300,000 children in Gaza … Continue reading

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Get Granny to the wedding

A 62-year-old resident of Gaza we’re calling B. has three daughters who have Israeli citizenship and live in Israel with their families. This summer B. received news that her granddaughter, who also lives in Israel, had gotten engaged. The wedding … Continue reading

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The Ones Who Got Away

Gaza celebrates Eid Al Fitr in the absence of thousands of young people who traveled out of Gaza via Rafah Crossing in search of a better future. Continue reading

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Alone in hospital

Last weekend, the heartbreaking story of Aisha Lulu, a five-year-old girl from the Gaza Strip who died after undergoing complex surgery in a hospital in east Jerusalem, circulated widely on social media. Aisha died in Gaza after spending a month … Continue reading

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No due process

In July 2017, Abeer (not her real name), a Gaza resident who had just been accepted to an M.A. program in engineering and business at Edinburgh University, submitted an application to the Israeli authorities for a permit to exit the … Continue reading

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A crack in the concrete ceiling

Majd Al Mashharawi, 24, is a young entrepreneur from the Gaza Strip. Among other innovations, she is the inventor of Green Cake, the environmentally friendly brick that can be used as an alternative to cement, which Israel limits from entering … Continue reading

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The story of Gaza’s solar-solution savant and her shipment stranded in Israel

Twenty-four-year-old Majd Al Mashharawi is a young entrepreneur from Gaza and a founder of Sun Box, a company that manufactures small-scale solar power devices for home use. In early July, Majd and her colleagues finalized arrangements for a shipment of equipment to enter Gaza. But ever since July 10, when Israel closed the Kerem Shalom Crossing to all but food and fuel, the shipment has been stuck at the Port of Ashdod in Israel. Continue reading

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What to do about Gaza?

Yesterday, the White House held a ‘brainstorming session’ to promote solutions for the humanitarian crisis in the Strip. Here are a few facts worth mentioning in any conversation about solutions for Gaza. Continue reading

Posted in economic development, General, Looking Forward, Movement of goods into Gaza, Movement of goods out of Gaza, Movement of people into Gaza, Movement of people out of Gaza | 1 Comment

An hour’s drive that took 12 years

Honoring Human Rights Day 2017: A story about a mother and daughter, and the meaning of losing the right to freedom of movement. Continue reading

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Bursting at the seams with potential

The textile industry has historically been one of the most important sectors of Gaza’s economy. Starting at the end of 2014, there was a narrow opening for the renewed sale of Gaza-made goods in the West Bank and then Israel and the sector began to recover. Unfortunately, blocks on permits and other restrictions are obstructing further progress. Continue reading

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