Love in the time of closure

This Valentine’s Day we bring you three stories of love as experienced under closure. Continue reading

Posted in Human rights, scale of control | 1 Comment

Hand on the Switch

A new report by Gisha takes an in-depth look at the grim state of Gaza’s electricity, water, sewage and communications infrastructure. The report describes how we got to this point and, for the first time, outlines and analyzes the responsibility shared among the various actors at play in the Gaza Strip today. Continue reading

Posted in Gas, Human rights, Infrastructure, scale of control | Leave a comment

What did the UN Security Council resolution leave out?

The divide created between the West Bank and Gaza is no coincidence. Rather, there is a political vision that seeks to fragment the Palestinian territory and thus undermines the rights dependent on access – the right to family life, to livelihood, to education and yes, also to self-determination. Continue reading

Posted in Human rights, Seperation Policy | 2 Comments

Freedom of movement – a right I took for granted until…

Noam Rabinovich was drawn to reflect on her own experience when Gisha took on the case of R., a young woman of 16 from Gaza who was accepted to a United World College, but needed our intervention to get a travel permit to attend school Continue reading

Posted in Human rights, Movement of people into Gaza, Movement of people out of Gaza | Leave a comment

The battle is not for national service spots, it is for the very foundation of democracy in Israel

Israeli media reported that the National Service Administration is set to take away national service volunteer spots from civil society organizations, including “Gisha”. This reveals a desire to silence legitimate criticism and to prevent public debate over matters of life and death Continue reading

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Selective hearing

One of the outcomes of the closure of Gaza is that toddlers with hearing impairments are less likely to receive the life-changing treatment that allows them a chance at hearing. It’s yet another side effect of movement restrictions, and particularly, the separation policy’s impact on civil society organizations operating in the Gaza Strip. Continue reading

Posted in Human rights, Movement of goods into Gaza, Movement of people into Gaza, Movement of people out of Gaza, Seperation Policy | Leave a comment

Lost in Translation

After a long legal battle, COGAT was forced to translate documents to Arabic for the benefit of Palestinians, but produced meaningless texts Continue reading

Posted in Human rights, Movement of people into Gaza, Movement of people out of Gaza, scale of control | Leave a comment

Fishing for answers about the dual-use list, coming up dry

Basic materials needed for construction and maintenance of fishing boats are included on the list of “dual-use” items banned from entering the Gaza Strip without a special permit. In practice, this allows Israel to deny Gaza’s fishing sector the items most essential for its survival. Continue reading

Posted in Movement of goods into Gaza | Leave a comment

Making it official: Arabic isn’t just relevant today

For the first time in its history, Israel’s parliament, the Knesset, is marking Arabic Language Day – something certainly worth marking, yet the pomp and ceremony may be a little exaggerated Continue reading

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The long road to Gaza

An Israeli Ministry of Transportation decision to limit traffic on the road leading to Gaza’s sole commercial crossing has been delayed thanks to a court petition. Meanwhile, Israel’s Minister of Defense announced that he gave orders to open Erez Crossing, in the northern Gaza Strip, to traffic of commercial goods. A solution must be found to the dangerous conditions on the road leading to Kerem Shalom, but one that preserves access for goods to and from Gaza. Continue reading

Posted in economic development, Infrastructure, Movement of goods into Gaza, Movement of goods out of Gaza | Leave a comment